Alison L. Miller, Ph.D.

Alison Miller

Assistant Research Professor, Health Behavior & Health Education

Assistant Research Scientist, Center for Human Growth and Development

3718 SPH I      Vcard icon
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029

Office: (734) 615-7459; Fax: (734) 615-2317

E-mail: alimill@umich.edu

Website(s): www.lumengmillerabclab.com

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Professional Summary

Dr. Miller is a developmental psychologist who studies risk and resilience in children and families. Dr. Miller is an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education (HBHE) in the UM School of Public Health. She was previously in the Department of Psychiatry (Division of Child and Family Psychiatry) at Brown Medical School. She is affiliated with Michigan’s Center for Human Growth and Development, where she directs the Clinical-Community Interventions Group and is a member of the Obesity Research Group. 

Education

NIMH T-32 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Developmental Psychopathology, Brown University Medical School, 2000-2002
Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan, 2000
M.A., Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan, 1997
B.A., Psychology, Wesleyan University, 1992

Research Interests & Projects

Dr. Miller's research focuses on child bio-behavioral regulation, family functioning, and social context.  She studies basic developmental processes, including self-regulation of emotions, sleep, eating behavior, and neuroendocrine stress responses in young children.  An overarching goal of her work is to apply findings from developmental science to foster positive child health and mental health outcomes. To that end, she implements and evaluates intervention studies focused on children and families in the areas of early childhood mental health; school readiness; positive youth development; parenting; and obesity prevention.  Dr. Miller works with children and families who are at risk for unhealthy outcomes for various reasons, including living with maternal incarceration; in poverty conditions; or in high-violence neighborhoods. For many such projects, she collaborates with community partners ranging from grassroots community-based organizations, to Head Start programs, to school systems. 

UM collaborators include colleagues from the School of Public Health, and the Departments of Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Neurology, and Psychology. Dr. Miller also collaborates with colleagues at Brown Medical School, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and Michigan State University. Dr. Miller has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Administration for Children, Youth and Families, the Centers for Disease Control, the US Department of Agriculture, and the American Heart Association for her work.

Selected Publications

Search PubMed for publications by Alison Miller >>

Miller, A. L., Clifford, C., Sturza, J., Rosenblum, K.,Vazquez, D. M., Kaciroti, N., & Lumeng, J.C. (2013). Blunted cortisol response to stress is associated with higher body mass index in low-income preschool-aged children. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 38 (11), 2611-2617.

Miller, A. L., Lumeng, C. N., Delproposto, J., Florek, B., & Lumeng, J. (in press). Obesity-related hormones in low-income preschool-age children: Implications for school readiness Mind, Brain, and Education

Miller, A. L., Perryman, J., Markovitz, L., Franzen, S., Cochran, S., & Brown, S. (2013). Strengthening incarcerated families: Evaluating a pilot program for children of incarcerated parents and their caregivers. Family Relations, 62 (4), 584–596.

Miller, A.L., Horodynski, M. A., Brophy-Herb, H. E., Peterson, K. E., Contreras, D., Kaciroti, N., Staples-Watson, J. & Lumeng, J.C. (2012). Enhancing self-regulation as a strategy for obesity prevention in Head Start preschoolers: The Growing Healthy Study BMC Public Health, 12

Berger, R. H., Miller, A. L., Seifer, R., Cares, S. R., & LeBourgeois, M. K. (2012). Acute sleep restriction effects on emotion responses in 30- to 36-month-old children Journal of Sleep Research, 21(3), 235-246.

Miller, A.L., Krusky, A., Franzen, S., Cochran, S., & Zimmerman, M. (2012). Partnering to translate evidence-based practices to community settings: Bridging the discovery-delivery gap. Health Promotion Practice, 13(4), 559-566.

Berhenke, A., Miller, A. L., Brown, E., Seifer, R., & Dickstein, S. (2011). Observed emotional and behavioral indicators of motivation predict school readiness in Head Start graduates. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 26, 430-441.

Miller, A. L., Fine, S. E., Gouley, K. K., Seifer, R., & Dickstein, S. (2006). Showing and telling about emotions: Interrelations between facets of emotional competence and associations with classroom adjustment in Head Start preschoolers. Cognition and Emotion, 20(8), 1170-1192.

Miller, A.L., Seifer, R., Stroud, L., Sheinkopf, S.J., & Dickstein, S. (2006). Biobehavioral indices of emotion regulation relate to school attitudes, motivation, and behavior problems in a low-income preschool sample. In Lester, B.M., Masten, A.S., and McEwen, B. (Ed.) Annals of The New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1094: Resilience In Children (325-329). Blackwell Publishing, Boston, MA..

Miller, A. L., Gouley, K. K., Seifer, R., Zakriski, A., Eguia, M., & Vergnani, M. (2005). Emotion knowledge skills in low-income elementary school children: Associations with social status and peer experiences. Social Development, 14, 637-651.

Professional Affiliations

The Society for Research in Child Development
The Society for Prevention Research
The American Psychological Association, Division 7 (Developmental Psychology)

Recent News Items

  • "Kids' lack of self-control tied to extra pounds," The Baltimore Sun, August 17, 2012
  • "Chronic Missed Naps Could Put Toddlers At Risk For Mood-Related Problems Later In Life," MediLexicon, January 05, 2012
  • "Nap-Deprived Tots May Be Missing out On More Than Sleep," Science Daily, January 03, 2012
  • "University of Michigan Awarded $4.9 Million to Help Reduce Obesity in Preschool Children," UofMhealth.org, March 14, 2011