Carl F. Marrs, Ph.D.

Carl Marrs

Associate Professor, Epidemiology

5116 SPH II      Vcard icon
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029

Office: (734) 647-2407; Fax: 734-764-3192

E-mail: cfmarrs@umich.edu

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Professional Summary

Dr. Carl F. Marrs is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology and has been part of the Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology faculty within the department since 1985. In addition to teaching and research, Dr. Marrs has been head of admissions for MPH students in the Epidemiology Department since 1992. Dr. Marrs was an interim director of the Public Health Genetics Interdepartmental Concentration, and is currently a faculty member of the steering committee for the Public Health Genetics Certificate program. Dr. Marrs is also involved in undergraduate education, and he both teaches a course for, and advises students in the Undergraduate Concentration in Microbiology. At a university wide level, Dr. Marrs has served at various capacities (including a stint as chair) on the University of Michigan Institutional Biosafety Committee, and he is currently Associate Chair of that committee.

Dr. Marrs' primary research expertise is in bacterial pathogenesis and genetics. He is involved in a wide variety of molecular epidemiologic research collaborations as part of the Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases (MAC-Epid). These include, but are not limited to, studies on Haemophilus influenzae in both otitis media and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); studies on Escherichia coli in both urinary tract infections and diarrheal disease; studies on Streptococcus agalactiae; Streptococcus mutans; Acinetobacter; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; and the microbiota of the oral and vaginal tracts.

Courses Taught

EPID460: Introduction to Bacterial Pathogenesis    Syllabus (PDF)
EPID511: Introduction to Public Health Genetics    Syllabus (PDF)
EPID560: Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis    Syllabus (PDF)
EPID565: Research in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology
EPID624: Readings in Epidemiology

Education

Ph.D., Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, 1982
B.S., Chemistry, University of Washington, 1975

Research Interests & Projects

Molecular epidemiology of Group B Streptococcus and Escherichia coli.

Virulence related genetic variation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

Haemophilus influenzae genes associated with acute otitis media and COPD.

Transmission dynamics and antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

Antibiotic resistance gene resistance transfer in biofilms.

Public health genetics.

Molecular epidemiology of oral and vaginal bacteria.

 

 

 

Selected Publications

Search PubMed for publications by Carl Marrs >>

McCrea, K.W., M.L. Wang, J. Xie, S.A. Sandstedt, J.H. Lee, G.S. Davis, J.H. Lee, C.F. Marrs, and J.R. Gilsdorf. (2010). Prevalence of the sodC gene in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus by microarray-based hybridization. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 48, 714-719.

Davila, J., L. Zhang, C.F. Marrs, R. Durmaz, and Z. Yang. (2010). Assessment of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis esxA, esxH, and fbpB genes among clinical isolates and its implication for the future immunization by new tuberculosis subunit vaccines Ag85B-ESAT-6 and Ag85B-TB10.4. Journal of Biomedicine Biotechnology

Zhang, Y., C.F. Marrs, C. Simon, and C. Xi. (2009). Wastewater treatment contributes to selective increase of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. Science of the Total Environment, 407, 3702-3706.

Zhang, L., B. Foxman, D.R. Drake, U. Srinivasan, J. Henderson, B. Olson, C.F. Marrs, J.J. Warren, and M.L. Marazita. (2009). Comparative whole-genome analysis of Streptococcus mutans isolates within and among individuals of different caries status. Oral Microbiology Immunology, 24, 197-203.

Sheline, K.D, A.M. France, S. Talarico, B. Foxman, L. Zhang, C.F. Marrs, J.H. Bates, M.D. Cave, and Z. Yang. (2009). Does the lipR gene of tubercle bacilli have a role in tuberculosis transmission and pathogenesis? Tuberculosis, 89, 114-119.

Zhang, L., U. Reddi, U. Srinivasan, S. Li, S. Borchardt, P. Pillai, P. Mehta, A. Styka, J. DeBusscher, C.F. Marrs and B. Foxman." (2008). Combining microarray technology and molecular epidemiology to identify genes associated with invasive group B Streptococcus. Interdisciplinary Journal of Infectious Diseases

Foxman, B., Gillespie, B., Manning, S., Marrs, C.F. (2007). Risk factors for GBS colonization: potential for different transmission systems by capsular type. Annals of Epidemiology, 17, 854-862.

Xie, J., L. Zhang, B. Foxman, C.F. Marrs. (2006). Molecular epidemiologic identification of Escherichia coli genes potentially involved in movement from the intestinal tract to the vagina and bladder. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 44, 2434-2441.

Foxman, B., L. Zhang, J.S. Koopman, S.D. Manning and C.F. Marrs. (2005). Choosing an appropriate bacterial typing technique for epidemiologic studies. Epidemiologic Perspectives and Innovations, 25 Nov 2005, 2:10.

Marrs, C.F., L. Zhang, and B. Foxman. (2005). Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: Are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes? FEMS Microbiology Letters, 252, 183-190.

Professional Affiliations

American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Society for Microbiology
Editorial Boards of Infection and Immunity, and Journal of Clinical Microbiology