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Marie O'Neill

Marie S. O'Neill, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Environmental Health Sciences

Associate Professor, Epidemiology

6623 SPH Tower      Vcard icon
1415 Washington Heights
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2029

Office: (734) 615-5135; Fax: (734) 936-7283

E-mail: marieo@umich.edu

Website(s): Center for Occupational Health and Safety Engineering

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Professional Summary

Marie O'Neill's research interests include health effects of air pollution, temperature extremes and climate change (mortality, asthma, hospital admissions, and cardiovascular endpoints); environmental exposure assessment; and socio-economic influences on health. She has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Pan American Health Organization, in Mexico at the National Institute of Public Health and the National Center for Environmental Health as a Fulbright Scholar, and as a Research Fellow in Environmental Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar at University of Michigan from 2004 to 2006.

Courses Taught

EHS608: Environmental Epidemiology
EPID530: Scientific Writing for Epidemiologists
EPID608: Environmental Epidemiology
EPID665: Research Seminar in International Health

Education

Ph.D., Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, 2000
M.S., Environmental Health Sciences, Harvard University, 1997
B.A., Environmental Studies/Hispanic Literature and Culture, Brown University, 1990

Research Interests & Projects

> > O'Neill Group - Environmental Epidemiology for Sustainability and Equity (Leader)

Our research in environmental epidemiology addresses associations between air pollution and health, climate change and health (with a specific emphasis on extreme temperatures) and environmental equity. Most research is accomplished using secondary datasets, including vital statistics data based in the U.S. and Latin America (Mexico, Chile and Brazil); data from large epidemiologic cohorts (Normative Aging Study, Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis), data from a study of asthmatic children in Detroit; exposure data derived from ambient temperature and air pollution monitoring ... More >>

Environmental epidemiology for sustainability and equity 

> > Reducing Social Disparities of Heatwave Impacts in a Changing Climate (Principal Investigator)

Climate change is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of heatwaves, and heat is already one of the principal weather-related causes of mortality in the U.S. Heat affects certain populations disproportionately, including African Americans and Latinos, city-dwellers, the elderly and the less affluent. The contribution of heatwaves to social disparities in health is an important target for translational research since several preventive interventions exist. Heatwave health warning systems (HHWS), heat island mitigation through tree planting and ... More >>

 

> > Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Birth Outcomes in Mexico City (Principal Investigator)

We will investigate how air pollution and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) component of particles can influence the outcome of pregnancy, and whether certain periods of gestation represent critical time windows and opportunities for preventive intervention.... More >>

 

> > Air Pollution, Inflammation and Preterm Birth: A Mechanistic Study in Mexico City (Principal Investigator)

We will advance understanding of prematurity by investigating how air pollution and inflammation may act together to influence the outcome of pregnancy, and whether certain periods of gestation represent critical time windows and opportunities for preventive interventions, both clinical and environmental.... More >>

 

> > Climate Change, Heatwaves and Health: Local Tools for Sustainability, Equity and Prevention (Principal Investigator)

Climate change is projected to increase the frequency and intensity of heat events, and heat is already one of the principal weather-related causes of mortality in the U.S., taking a disproportionate toll on the elderly, the poor, and racial minorities. Heatwave health warning systems (HHWS), heat island mitigation through tree planting and other measures, and other programs administered by local governments can improve quality of life, foster environmental sustainability, and protect public health during heatwaves. With increasing evidence for ... More >>

 

> > Heat-Related Hospital Admissions Among the Elderly: Community, Socio-economic and Medical Determinants of Vulnerability and Economic Impacts (Principal Investigator)

We will quantify impacts of climate change on health by assessing which individual and community characteristics reflect special vulnerability, in a study of heat and hospital admissions among the elderly in U.S. cities.... More >>

 

> > Prospective Study of Atherosclerosis, Clinical Cardiovascular Disease, and Long Term Exposure to Ambient Particulate Matter in a Multi-Ethnic Cohort (MESA Air) (Additional Personnel)

This multi-site, prospective cohort study examines the relationship between air pollutants, the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis, and incidence of cardiovascular events.... More >>

 

Selected Publications

Search PubMed for publications by Marie O'Neill >>

O'Neill, M.S., Kinney, P.L., Cohen, A.J. (2008). Environmental equity in air quality management: Local and international implications for air quality and climate change Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health

O'Neill, M.S., McMichael, A.J., Schwartz, J., Wartenberg, D. (2007). Poverty, environment and health: The role of environmental epidemiology and environmental epidemiologists. Commentary. Epidemiology, Vol. 18, No. 6, 664-668.

O'Neill, M.S., Diez-Roux, A.V., Auchincloss, A.H., Franklin, T.G., Jacobs, Jr., D., Astor, B.C., Dvonch, J.T., Kaufman, J. (2007). Airborne particulate matter exposure and urinary albumin excretion: The Multi Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Occupational and Environmental Medicine., Published Online First: 21 November 2007. doi:10.1136/oem.2007.035238

Park, S.K., O'Neill, M.S., Wright, R., Hu, H., Vokonas, P.S., Sparrow, D., Suh, H.H. and Schwartz, J. (2006). HFE genotype, particulate air pollution and heart rate variability: a gene-environment interaction. Circulation, 114(25), 2798-2805.

O'Neill, M.S., Loomis, D. and Borja-Aburto, V.H. (2004). Ozone, area social conditions, and mortality in Mexico City. Environmental Research, 234-242.

O'Neill, M.S., Jerrett, M., Kawachi, I, Levy, J.I., Cohen, A.J., Gouveia, N., Wilkinson, P., Fletcher, T., Cifuentes, L. and Schwartz, J. (2003). Health, wealth and air pollution: advancing theory and methods. Environmental Health Perspectives, 111(16), 1861-1870.

O'Neill, M.S., Zanobetti, A. and Schwartz, J. (2003). Modifiers of the temperature and mortality association in seven U.S. cities. American Journal of Epidemiology, 157(12), 1074-1082.

O'Neill, M.S, Ramirez-Aguilar, M., Meneses-Gonzalez, F., Geyh, A., Sienra-Monge, J.J., Hernandez-Avila, M. and Romieu, I. (2003). Ozone exposure among Mexico City outdoor workers. Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association, 53, 339-346.

O'Neill, M.S. (1996). Helping school children with asthma breathe easy: partnerships in community-based environmental health education. Environmental Health Perspectives, 104(5), 464-466.

Professional Affiliations

International Society for Environmental Epidemiology
Society for Epidemiologic Research